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Archive for the ‘Salads’ Category

Last weekend I had some friends over for brunch. I picked some goodies out of the garden and brunch began to unfold.

I had been craving this carrot salad so I made some using the parsley. I sliced the radish and tossed it with some english cucumber and salt for another fresh treat, perhaps now is a good time to mention that I love salads. We also made some gently scrambled eggs with garden leeks, spinach, sun-dried tomatoes and capers. I tossed a sprig of thyme and rosemary in with the leeks to give some aroma and extra flavor.

K and A brought over some delicious Humboldt Fog goat cheese, a perfect accompaniment to the Whole Emmer (Wheat) Sourdough I had made the day before.

For dessert we had fresh fruit and some of the Sachertorte I made in class last week (I have moved on from the bread portion of baking school to pastry.)

Between the brunch and the lovely sunny weather, we had a perfect picnic.

After lunch, we retired to the lawn with several baking books and enjoyed the sunshine.

(photo credit: Angel Trumpet Tree)

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After a week of cool and cloudy weather the sun finally came out this weekend which means that our asparagus patch took off! I went outside and harvested several pounds of tender spears.

Tonight for dinner I made myself a very simple and delicious meal. I took two sheets of feuille de brik (a Tunisian phyllo dough-like pastry) and brushed them each with a little melted butter and olive oil.  I selected several spears sliced them and sautéed them in a little water and butter.

I divided the asparagus amongst the two sheets, I then added some Prairie Breeze cheese (a local cheddar) to one and an egg to the other.

I folded them up and placed them in a hot frying pan. When they were almost finished I popped them in the oven under the broiler for a minute or so to get them extra crispy. I also made myself a very simple salad of feta cheese and sweet peppers.

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Last week we had a Tunisian cooking class at my mom’s store. My good friends Sarah and Katie taught the class. Sarah has been doing a lot of research on Tunisian food, and to my delight a lot of practice too! We made several different dishes: lablabi, mlauoi, m’hamsa salad, torchi, carrot feta salad, and gateau a l’orange.

Lablabi is a Tunisian chickpea stew, it is the one food that is consistently available on the streets of Tunisia both night and day. The lablabi stands don’t have any signage, but rather, they have tall stacks of bowls made specifically for eating lablabi in. So that the chickpeas get very sweet and tender, the stall-keepers start cooking them in the wee hours of the morning and keep them on the flame all day long. We weren’t quite as diligent on this step, but we started cooking the chickpeas first thing in the morning (at about 8am instead of 3am.)

There are a few musts for preparing lablabi, it must be served with bread, toasted cumin, harissa and a drizzle of olive oil. Beyond that, you are free to add whatever condiments you like. Sarah recommends adding capers, preserved lemon and brine, and sun-dried tomatoes.

First in the bowl is the bread (ripped into pieces) then a scoop of chickpeas with plenty of broth, (making sure to have enough broth after the bread has soaked some up) followed by the condiments.

After you have added everything be sure to mix it up very well so you get all the flavors in each bite!

The next thing we learned how to make was mlaoui, a traditional semolina flatbread. These breads are very simple to make, you mix together semolina flour and a little all-purpose flour, some salt and olive oil. Then add enough water so that the dough ends up looking something like this.

You will need a lot of water! Semolina soaks up a lot more than you would think. After achieving the right consistency, it needs to rest for at least 20 minutes. Turn the dough out onto a clean work surface and knead it, sprinkling a little bit of water as you go. The dough should be soft and malleable. Divide it into 4 pieces and let it rest a bit longer.

Then you spread the dough out in a large somewhat translucent rectangle and rub it with a little olive oil and a sprinkling of semolina and fold it in on itself like a letter going into an envelope.

Press the dough out again and roll it up. (If you want to make little breads, you can slice the roll into pieces.)

Press the roll (on end) into a thin circle and place it on a hot griddle. Cook it until the bread is lightly golden and flip. Flip it once more and hope it puffs up!

During the initial rest period, we prepared several salads (all of which pair very well with the mlaoui!)

This next dish is something I make at home quite often, it is a m’hamsa (couscous) salad. We sautéed some summer squash, sweet and hot peppers in olive oil. Towards the end of cooking, we tossed in some already cooked beans, and caraway seeds. When the m’hamsa was ready, we added the veggies to it and finished it with a squeeze of lemon juice, chopped mint, and parsley.

Torchi is a quick pickle. You can use just about any vegetable that is in season,(some common ones are radishes, cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, and fennel.)  We used red cabbage, the color was stunning! To make torchi, you chop fresh vegetables and dress them with some toasted and lightly ground coriander, salt, champagne vinegar, and of course, a bit of harissa. You can eat it right a way or you can let it sit over night in the fridge.

I have always loved carrot salad and this Carrot and Feta salad is no exception! I mean how can you go wrong with carrots, harissa, feta, raisins, a sprinkling of mint and parsley,  and a squeeze of lemon? Let me answer that for you, you can’t!

For dessert we made Gateau a l’Orange (an Orange cake made with olive oil!) It involves using the entire orange, minus the seeds. After removing the seeds, you put the oranges in a food processor and grind them to a pulp. In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs and sugar, add the flour baking powder and olive oil. Mix. Add the orange pulp and mix again. Sprinkle with some sesame seeds and bake.

We also made a rose geranium syrup to brush on to the cake while it was cooling.

To finish off the meal we had some mint tea, traditionally served with toasted pine nuts.

Note: For a complete version of the recipes click here.

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simple summer lunch

Yesterday I made myself a very simple and satisfying little lunch. I made some m’hamsa couscous, a traditional Berber style couscous from Tunisia, and then went out to the garden and picked some tomatoes, basil, and a carrot. I brought them inside and rinsed off any dirt. I also pulled out a couple of my favorite condiments wild caper flowers, preserved lemons, and harissa (all Tunisian) from the fridge and chopped away. I didn’t salt my couscous so I left the salt on the capers.

I put the couscous in a bowl and tossed everything on top, added a drizzle of olive oil and a squeeze of lemon. Delicious!

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Last week my friend Erika came to visit from Italy. (Erika is the maker of Traditional Balsamic Vinegar of Modena.) Her visit was centered around a Balsamic vinegar tasting that we did together at Zingerman’s Deli.

We did several food pairings with the various ages and wood types (the different woods impart different flavors.) Strawberries with 12 year cherry barrels, potatoes and tuna with 12 year juniper barrels, bruschetta with 12 year mulberry barrels, mixed greens and ricotta salad with 25 year mixed barrels, Parmigiano Reggiano with 25 year mulberry barrels, and of course vanilla gelato with 25 year cherry barrels.

Erika even brought a bottle of vinegar that came from the set of barrels that were started for her great-grandmother’s dowry in 1842. This one is so good you eat it alone! Needless to say, this was a big hit.

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